You can find plenty of advice on why joining a writing or critique group helps to improve your writing. Setting aside the rather obvious point that having more eyeballs reviewing your work provides more opportunities for feedback, it’s important to consider some of the benefits of these groups that have nothing to do with your own writing, at least not directly.

The novelist John Gardner once remarked that alcoholism was the primary occupational hazard of the author. As much as I love this comment, I think he mistook the symptom for the cause. The real occupational hazard of the author is isolation. Writing is a very isolating endeavor. You can be as outgoing and socially engaging as you want, but at some point, the only way writing is going to get done is when you sit down alone with the keyboard (or pen and paper if you’re self-consciously old fashioned). Once that process begins, it’s easy to become cut off from anything that’s not directly related to the work at hand.

In some respects, this kind of intense focus is a good thing because it allows you to tune out distractions and pour your creative energy into the writing. At some point, however, you need to come up for air and remember that your project doesn’t exist in a vacuum. Your book isn’t the “only book in the world” even though it often feels that way.

Before joining a newly formed writing group earlier this year, I’d never really associated with other writers. I showed material I was working on with a few close friends, but none of them were writers themselves. After a period of frustration over how to direct my writing energies, I joined the group in the hope it might provide me with new perspectives.

After a few weeks of reading various works in progress, I learned that my approach to writing fiction and the topics I choose to write about are merely a drop of water in a vast ocean. This is something I knew intellectually, of course, but it’s one thing to read completed works you might not normally be drawn to and quite another to engage with the authors of those works as they’re writing them. Discussing and critiquing someone else’s writing isn’t just about the writing itself; it helps you to imagine yourself behind another writer’s keyboard, to understand why and how they write. Learning different approaches and techniques to writing can help you to reevaluate your own creative process, which can be quite valuable if you feel yourself falling into unproductive habits or simply want to try something new.

I think it’s healthy for writers to get out of their own heads every so often, and a good writing/critique group can do a lot to bring their thoughts and assumptions about writing out into the open. If you’re stuck or frustrated with your work, exposing yourself to other writers going through the same struggles might just provide you the perspective you need to get moving forward again.

And yes, you’ll have plenty of knowledgeable people to help critique your works in progress, but you already knew that!